Mobile Home Park Act

When Colorado lawmakers recently turned their attention to mobile home parks for the first time in decades, one particular bill inspired some residents to start thinking big — beyond the chronic battles with park owners over rising rents and questionable evictions.

A new provision in the Mobile Home Park Act, which went into effect in June, gives residents the opportunity to purchase the property where they’ve parked their trailers — permanently, for the most part — and start calling their own shots as a cooperative. And now, some are seizing that opportunity, banding together and taking steps toward purchases aimed at preserving a lifestyle that represents the state’s largest nonsubsidized affordable housing option for more than 100,000 Coloradans.

But a process that in the best cases can be difficult is even more fraught in the age of coronavirus, when many residents’ economic health has been compromised as the need to secure housing certainty looms even more critical.

MORE: Read “Parked: Half the American Dream,” the Sun’s statewide look at the unique issues facing mobile home residents across Colorado.

Anecdotally, multiple mobile home parks across the state have announced to residents their intent to sell, as required by the new law. But the state Department of Local Affairs, which manages the Mobile Home Park Oversight Program, said that DOLA hasn’t yet determined the exact number of parks that have given notice.

However, residents currently testing this opportunity have confronted significant challenges — from gaining access to capital for multi-million-dollar transactions to taking on debt burdens that would price some of their neighbors out of their communities.

 

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